University of the District of Columbia Law Review

Welcome to website of The University of the District of Columbia Law Review (UDC Law Review) at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law (UDC-DCSL), where Activism Meets Scholarship.


Call for Papers

Not All Controversies End in Court: Checking the Balance in Alternative Dispute Resolution

Symposium Date: March 27, 2015

Deadline for Proposal Submission: November 1, 2014

The University of the District of Columbia Law Review at the David A. Clarke School of Law is pleased to announce a call for papers/presenters for its 2015 symposium edition, Not All Controversies End in Court: Checking the Balance in Alternative Dispute Resolution.

Our School: The David A. Clarke School of Law (DCSL) at the University of the District of Columbia is the only public interest law school in the nation’s capital. Its student body is one of the most diverse in the United States, with significant representation by women, minorities, and older students. DCSL is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as being among the top ten law schools in the nation for clinical training. The school’s practical emphasis on helping low-income and disenfranchised communities is reflected in the law review’s motto: Where activism meets scholarship.

Our Topic: The field of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) has expanded rapidly over the past decade and has become mandatory under a growing list of circumstances. Although clear evidence demonstrates cost and time savings through ADR, an increasing number of activists and scholars have criticized its use as a privatization of justice. Beyond efficiency, under what circumstances can ADR provide a just resolution that might not be available to parties through traditional litigation? What safeguards must be included to ensure that ADR fosters the desired win-win outcome, and does not result in a form of second-class justice that denies parties their day in court? And what can be done to prevent societal biases and power differentials from creating disparate treatment for parties in ADR based on race, gender, ethnicity, or worker status?

By featuring a varied range of topics, the symposium will demonstrate the relevance of ADR within a broad spectrum of the law, and will aim to promote creative engagement among diverse parties.

A few of the topics that we will explore include class actions in labor arbitration, ethical challenges for mediators, community involvement in environmental settlements, and dispute resolution processes within the context of international elections. The law review’s editorial board invites submissions on any topic related to ADR. Submissions from academics and practitioners are welcome.

To be considered for inclusion in the 2015 symposium, please send an abstract (200-word limit) of the proposed paper by November 1 to lawreview@udc.edu, with Attn: Sally Tyler in the subject line.

 

Activism Meets Scholarship